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University Awards

Congratulations 2022 honorees!

At Homecoming, BYU recognizes alumni and other individuals for contributions to their field, communities, and the university.

See past 2021 University Awardees here.

Amy Antonelli

Amy Antonelli

BA ’03 American Studies

Distinguished Alumni Award

Amy Antonelli is the Chief Executive Officer of Humanitarian Experience (HXP, previously known as HEFY). This summer, HXP sent over 5,000 teenagers out on sustainable service expeditions to 47 global locations. Collectively they are driven by one clear purpose: to love God and love people. Prior to HXP, Amy was a spokesperson for Apple's executive officers, including CEO Steve Jobs, and was instrumental in building PowerSchool, Inc., before its acquisition by Apple. She subsequently led an initiative with Facebook’s leadership team to develop a mission-driven internal community, and another with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to develop a global self-reliance mentoring strategy. Amy holds a master’s degree from Harvard University and a bachelor’s from BYU. She served a mission in Italy and Malta, and as the first Executive Director of Rising Star Outreach, she spent seven of the best years of her life living and working among the people of leprosy colonies in rural India. She considers her life proof of the promise she lives by: there will be miracles.

David and Julie Colton

David and Julie Colton

David: BA ’79 Economics, JD ’82 Julie: BS ‘76

Both David and Julie Colton believe strongly in giving back to their community. Since graduating from BYU Law School, David has served on professional and community boards and held several church callings. His work as General Counsel and Vice President for several large corporations has taken him to many remote corners of the world, giving him an appreciation for the diversity of various cultures. Julie is no stranger to service either; since graduating from BYU with a degree in elementary education, she has served in several community groups, including the Commission on the Status of Women at the United Nations, and the Frankfurt Community Association for Inclusion and Diversity while David served as Europe Area Legal Counsel. Together, David and Julie have served as government relations missionaries representing LDS Charities at the United Nations in New York City. They recently traveled to Berlin, Germany, where they volunteered at the Europe Special Olympics—and they’re excited to volunteer again when Berlin hosts the 2023 International Special Olympics. Dave is currently serving as the Chairman of the International Center for Law and Religion Studies at BYU Law. Dave and Julie recently received a call to serve a mission as directors of the Washington DC visitors center starting in January. Of all their accomplishments, their most cherished moments are in one-on-one ministering to their friends and family of nine children and 32 grandkids.

Denise Lindberg

Denise Lindberg

JD ‘88

Distinguished Alumni Award

Denise Posse Lindberg, a Cuban native, holds a bachelor’s degree from BYU and Masters’ and Doctoral degrees from the U of U. In 1988, she earned her law degree magna cum laude from BYU Law School. After graduation, she clerked for Judge Monroe G. McKay and for Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Denise practiced appellate and health law at two national law firms in Washington, DC, returning to Utah in 1995 as general counsel for a managed mental health company. She later served as a district court judge in Utah’s Third Judicial District. Denise served on the Young Women General Board and on the Board of Directors of LDS Family Services. Denise and her husband, Neil, are Senior Fellows with BYU’s International Center for Law and Religion Studies and represented the Center and Latter-day Saint Charities at the Organization of American States in Washington, D.C. Concurrently, she was a consultant with the Dominican Republic’s National Judicial College. Currently, she serves on the executive committee of the Latin American Consortium for Religious Liberty and speaks frequently at international conferences.

Yong-In Spencer Shin

Yong-In Spencer Shin

BS ’78 Electrical Engineering, MEng ‘80

Distinguished Alumni Award

Born in South Korea, Yong-In Spencer Shin moved to the US to attend BYU in 1974. After receiving a bachelor’s and master’s degree in electrical engineering, he continued on to get his Ph.D. in economics and business management from Netherlands’ Erasmus University Rotterdam. He is married to Hyo-Sun Chi from Seoul, and the pair has six children and 12 grandchildren. Yong-In’s career has involved design engineering, being the senior executive of several multi-national companies, and owning a technology business consulting firm. His experience allowed him to teach several graduate classes at colleges around the world, and he has served on several boards including BYU’s Marriott School National Advisory Council. In addition to his many patents and publications, Yong-In wrote and published Plain and Precious, a book exploring the connection between the Bible and the Book of Mormon. Yong-In is active in his service in the Church; after serving as a bishop, branch president, and mission president, he and his wife currently serve as remote senior service missionaries for the North-East Asia Area.

Ezekiel and Pauline Sanchez

Ezekiel and Pauline Sanchez

Honorary Alumni Award

Ezekiel and Pauline Sanchez, coming from humble beginnings, never thought they would be guided to see the Seed of Greatness in youth and families. They created the ANASAZI Foundation, a place for parents and children to have a New Beginning. Pauline, the second-oldest of nine children, lived with a foster family in Utah for ten years while participating in the LDS Indian Placement Program—returning to her Navajo family on the reservation in the summers. The second of 16 Totonac Indian children, Ezekiel spent most of his young life constantly moving with a band of migrant workers. He was only able to start high school at 19 years old, and he graduated three years later with an art scholarship to BYU. Pauline, the second of nine children, lived with a foster family in Utah for ten years while participating in the LDS Indian Placement Program—returning to her Navajo family on the reservation in the summers. After being baptized at BYU, 27-year-old Ezekiel left on a mission at the age of 27. Upon his return, he met Pauline in the Lamanite Generation at BYU, and later they were sealed in the Salt Lake City Temple. Ezekiel and Pauline have raised seven children of their own; served as seminary teachers on the Navajo Reservation in Lukachukai, AZ; and developed ANASAZI, The Making of a Walking (a wilderness program for youth at risk). The Native American couple has blessed the lives of countless youth and families. The Sanchez’s were recognized as Arizona’s 2001 Parents of the Year and received the 2002 National Excellence in Parenting award from the National Parents’ Day Council.